1984 Honor: A Solitary Blue (Heron, or Boy)

VERDICT: Meh

Laurinda’s Rating: 3/5

A Solitary Blue, one of the 1984 Newbery Honor selections, is set in the same universe as Voigt’s Dicey’s Song, the 1983 Newbery Medal Winner, reviewed by Sally and I. It follows Jeffrey from roughly ages 6-17. A Solitary Blue focuses heavily on relationships and emotions. When Jeff is in early elementary school, his vivacious mother Melody, always involved superficially in a cause, walks out for the final time, leaving Jeff with his very reserved father. Jeff always calls his father The Professor. Jeff decides that homeostasis is the way to go, so as he grows up, he increasingly takes on the task of keeping everything neat and orderly for The Professor.

When Jeff is in middle school, he comes down with a bad case of pneumonia. His father doesn’t initially realise he is sick; it takes the intervention of kind family freed Brother Brian to knock The Professor out of his shell. The illness also leads to renewed contact between Melody and the family she left behind, including an invitation for Jeff to spend the summer with her in Charleston.

The first summer Jeff spends in Charleston is freeing. His emotional mother helps him express himself fully. Jeff is immersed in the luxury which his extended family’s income affords them, while still having the freedom to go exploring the city. The transition back to life with his reserved father is challenging. With the memory of the first summer, Jeff has high hopes for another one. However, things are much different. His mother is dismissive of him or away with her boyfriend much of the time, his older relatives are hateful, and the experience is unpleasant. On one of the last nights Jeff has there, he has a knockdown fight in which his mother verbally destroys him, to which he responds somewhat in kind. Jeff is overwrought and takes the boat he purchased earlier in the summer out to an island he had been exploring. He finally finds a bit of solace in a solitary blue heron.

Life isn’t much better when he gets home, as he feels incredibly betrayed by his mother; he takes to skipping school. This actually provides an opening for a growing relationship with his father once The Professor discovers what’s going on; the two bond over mutual hurt. At his dad’s suggestion, the two look for a new house and find a lovely cabin, sealed with the presence of a blue heron.

Although not always easy – his mother claims she’s going to sue for custody when his parent’s divorce is finalized, for example – Jeff makes friends in his new home, including with the Tillerman family from Dicey’s Song. It comes as a surprise to Jeff when his great grandmother leaves him the estate. He chooses to keep her engagement ring but pass the rest along to the former household staff. His final interaction with his capricious and manipulative mother is when she arrives asking about the ring. To be quits of her, he trades rings with her, keeping the one that is tied to family history while allowing her the monetarily valuable one.

This is not an easy book to read. I basically alternated which parent I wanted to scream at initially. My heart broke for Jeff at times, particularly when his mother deliberately attempted to manipulate him. It deals a lot with emotions and relationships and less so with action. The author’s character development keeps it from being a complete snore, but it’s still a pretty angsty book. I went through a phase when I was in middle school when this over-the-top angst might have appealed. As an adult, it was a bit much. However, I appreciated the book for dealing with some of the hard parts of both severing and establishing relationships, as well as the author’s lovely description of the natural beauty which soothed Jeff’s soul. It’s not bad, but neither do I recommend it highly.

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