2014 Honor: One Came Home

VERDICT: Treasure

Sally’s Rating: 3.5/5

One Came Home is a Western adventure story about a tenacious teenage girl who takes off on her own to solve a deadly mystery. Taking place in Wisconsin during 1871, an unidentifiable body shows up a few days after Georgie’s sister ran away from home. Everyone believes the body to be Agatha’s, except for Georgie, who decides to leave town to find out the truth of what happened to her sister. On her journey, she runs into some unwanted friends and some unsavory criminals, but ultimately has to find the inner strength to deal with her family’s tragedy.

Death plays a central role in the novel as Georgie goes through the grieving process while trying to figure out what happened to her sister. Her relationship with her sister’s former suitor, Billy, builds up nicely as they both have secrets they’ve kept from each other about her missing sister. Georgie is a strong heroine for young readers. She’s skilled with a rifle and doesn’t hesitate to use it to save her friend’s life. It’s fun to read about a girl who is placed in a masculine-heavy frontier setting and how she has adapted to this type of worldview.

The world building is interesting as well. A portion of the Georgie’s numerous flashbacks and interactions with her sister focuses on the skill of pigeoning as vast swarms of pigeons begin nesting in hordes in the rural Wisconsin landscape. The author weaves the history of this hunting sport into the overall mystery, adding to the ruggedness of the setting that Georgie finds herself in.

I found this book to be very enjoyable and would have given it a higher rating had the ending not let me down. While kid readers will not complain about the happily-ever-after resolution, the narrative felt like it was leading to a different place than where it actually ended up. While I enjoyed the adventure, the ending left me feeling unsatisfied.

Overall, I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend this book to junior high students as a starting point into the Western genre. Though the beginning is a bit slow, Amy Timberlake’s One Came Home picks up when Georgie sets out on her own. The main character is a likable heroine, and her relationships with her family and townsfolk feel authentic and true to the time period, making for an entertaining adventure.

 

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1981 Honor: The Fledgling

VERDICT: Trash

Sally’s Rating: 2/5

Jane Langton’s The Fledgling is about a young girl’s obsession with flying, but it fails to meet the same great heights of other magical realism stories that focus on human and animal friendships. In this Newbery Honor winner, Georgie becomes obsessed with the idea that she can fly and befriends a Canadian goose who takes her on flights during the night. Her family doesn’t understand her innocent yearning to fly and her interfering neighbor’s deadly vendetta against the harmless, old goose leads to inevitable tragedy.

This was an odd book. The magical realism aspect of the story was a bit too much for me, and the ending left me a bit confused and wondering what the point of the novel was. The main character is very sympathetic, as she feels truly alone as no one else truly understands her, but the family supports her in the best way they can, nonetheless. The flying scenes encompass the best parts of the book since the writing style really allows for the reader to feel the freedom and wonderment that Georgie feels.

The setting at Walden Pond is well integrated in the novel, with one of the characters researching the works of Henry David Thoreau, and the themes of transcendentalism are embedded within the narrative allowing for an easy way to introduce young readers to this type of literature.

This book has a lot of potential, and the writing style is very beautiful, infusing the story with a dream-like quality. Despite this, I would not recommend the book, unless you are a big fan of flying geese or transcendentalism.