1955 Honor: The Courage of Sarah Noble

VERDICT: Treasure

Sally’s Rating: 3/5

The Courage of Sarah Noble by Alice Dalgliesh is a pleasantly surprising children’s book that emphasizes the positives of the newly budding relationship between white settlers and Native Americans in the early 1700s. Eight-year-old Sarah travels with her father into the Connecticut wilderness to help build a house. When her father leaves to get her mother and sister, Sarah musters up her courage and stays with the nearby Indians, waiting for her family to return.

This was a very simplistic and charming book based on the true story of the first settlers of the town of New Milford, Connecticut who were friendly with the Indians in their region. While this book is definitely targeted towards younger readers, Sarah is an admirable heroine for readers of all ages who braves the wilderness by herself and learns a completely new culture. Her adaptability in a foreign situation can get children thinking about how they would do in a different culture and makes for a heroine who also has to stick up for her newfound friends when her family doesn’t quite approve of them.

This novel’s simplicity is its greatest strength as well as its greatest weakness. There’s not much conflict, and the plot is pretty lacking despite having a strong main character. Despite this, The Courage of Sarah Noble could easily be a great discussion starter to get children interested in American history in colonial times. While it does have some stereotypical American Indian characters in supporting roles, it definitely beats other early year Newbery winners such as Daniel Boone and The Matchlock Gun in its portrayal of Indians as more than just savages, but this book lacks the subtlety and thematic weight of later Newbery Honor winner The Sign of the Beaver.