2017: The Girl Who Drank the Moon

VERDICT: Treasure

Sally’s Rating: 3.5/5

The 2017 Newbery Medal winner, The Girl Who Drank the Moon, tells a story with a magical cast of characters, including an ancient witch, a friendly swamp monster, a tiny dragon, and a girl who has consumed the power of moonlight.

The premise is great. The book cleverly turns some fairy tale tropes on their head – the wicked witch is actually a loving grandmother figure, the special child is the one causing havoc with her immense powers, and the typical hero becomes a bitter man out to get misguided justice.

The first hundred pages were really strong, focusing on the witch, Xan, and her dilemma of dealing with her mistake of putting the powerful magic of moonlight into Luna, a child she saved from being sacrificed. Her interactions with Glerk and Fyrian were great to read about, but the plot loses steam halfway through once Luna loses her memories of magic. By this point, the book became a chore to get through as the scope of the narrative expands to some plot points that didn’t really interest me. The ending, however, satisfyingly ties up all the emotional character beats.

The writing style is where I took issue with this book. With the constant point of view hopping, the narrative seemed to frantically shift whenever I just started to get into the plot of a certain character, resulting in many of the characters lacking depth. The narration makes the reader feel like an observer rather than a participant in the action – which I guess imitates the storytelling style of fairy tales.

I wanted to like this book more than I did. I liked that the author was experimenting with different story components that you don’t often see in children’s books, but it failed to come together in an engaging way.

Recommended for lovers of fairy tales and magical beings.

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1968 Honor: Jennifer, Hecate, Macbeth, William McKinley, and Me, Elizabeth

VERDICT: Treasure

Sally’s Rating: 3/5

E. L. Konigsburg’s Newbery Honor winning book follows the ups and downs of a new friendship between two lonely girls who have overly vivid imaginations.

When Elizabeth moves to town, she has no friends until she meets a classmate who claims to be a witch. Elizabeth is taken on as an apprentice where she must go through a series of tasks to prove herself – eating raw eggs for a week, creating an ointment that will let them fly, and casting small spells (just using their imaginations). As their friendship grows, one final task threatens to tear the girls apart when Elizabeth is ordered to throw their pet toad into a boiling potion.

In my opinion, the two main characters set this book apart from other contemporary fiction books. Elizabeth is a lonely girl who just wants a friend and blindly follows Jennifer’s instructions no matter how strange they sound. Jennifer, on the other hand, is a character who doesn’t care what other people think about the way she talks, the way she acts, or the way she dresses. Both characters complement the other, making it easy to understand why their friendship develops since both of them are outsiders. You can feel their desperation for a friend in every conversation they have, even if the girls don’t have much in common at first.

This book was not exactly what I was expecting; however, the nostalgia factor made this book more enjoyable than it should of been. If you ever enjoyed playing make believe as a kid, this book will probably bring back some of those memories. Its downside was the slow pace, outdated feel of ’60s day-to-day life, and the fact that nothing exciting happened in the plot – it was basically just Elizabeth doing a lot of random things to become a witch.

Overall, I found this to be a good excuse for a walk down memory lane. Konigsburg also wrote the Newbery winner for this year as well – From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler – which I thought was far superior to this one.